Archive for the Culture Category

In the Tower

Posted in Culture with tags , , on August 1, 2013 by substanceandstyledc

Kerry-James-MarshallKerry James Marshall is known for his work that explores the experiences of African Americans and the narratives of American history that have often excluded black people. The National Gallery of Art presents In the Tower: Kerry James Marshall, the sixth in a series of Tower installations focusing on developments in art since midcentury through December 7, 2013.

The dominant theme of the exhibit is described by the National Gallery as a look at ‘the transport of African slaves to America in the Middle Passage—the second or “middle” leg of the triangular trade of manufactured goods, slaves, and crops that transpired between Europe, Africa, and the American colonies from the colonial period until the middle of the 19th century. Marshall’s works explore the economic, sociological, and psychological aftermath of this foundational episode of US history. In his art, the past is never truly past: history exerts a constant, often unconscious pressure on the living.’

Strange Fruit

Posted in Culture with tags , , , on July 10, 2013 by substanceandstyledc

fruitvale-station-posterWhen the film premiered at the Sundance Film Festival it captured both the Grand Jury Prize for dramatic feature and the Audience Award for US dramatic film. More than that, it captured the hearts of everyone who saw it. And as the saying goes, ‘what’s on the heart is always on the tongue.’ In this case, the movers in shakers in cinema can’t stop talking about the brave and honest artistry of director Ryan Coogler’s tracing of the last few hours of the life of Oscar Grant in his film Fruitvale Station.

Fruitvale Station, opening in Washington area theaters July 19, follows the true story of a 22-year-old Bay Area resident who wakes up on the morning of December 31, 2008 and feels something in the air. Not sure what it is, he takes it as a sign to get a head start on his resolutions: being better son to his mother, partner to his girlfriend Sophina, and being a better father to Tatiana, their beautiful four year-old daughter. Crossing paths with friends, family and strangers, Oscar starts out well, as the day goes on, he realizes that changes are not going to come easily. His resolve takes a tragic turn, however, when BART officers shoot him in cold blood at the Fruitvale subway stop on New Year’s Day. Oscar’s life and tragic death would shake the Bay Area – and the entire nation – to its very core.

Bold, Beautiful, Black Light

Posted in Culture on July 3, 2013 by substanceandstyledc

faith2American People, Black Light: Faith Ringgold’s Paintings of the 1960s on now on view at the National Museum of Women in the Arts though November 10, 2013. Faith Ringgold is well known for originating the African American story quilt revival in the late 1970s. In the previous decade, she created bold, provocative paintings in direct response to the Civil Rights and feminist movements. Ringgold’s unprecedented exploration of race and gender in America is examined in this comprehensive survey of 49 rarely-exhibited paintings. Read a feature about the artist and exhibit here.

Simply Beautiful Film

Posted in Culture with tags , , on June 26, 2013 by substanceandstyledc

tnance_filmWest End Cinema brings the much talked about debut film An Oversimplification of Her Beauty to Washington audiences June 28 – July 4. Following the June 28 7:20pm and June 30 5:00pm screenings, the director Terence Nance will pop in the theater via Skype for a Q&A session.

The film documents the relationship between Terence and a lovely young woman as it teeters on the divide between platonic and romantic. An Oversimplification of Her Beauty blurs the line between narrative, documentary, and experimental film as it explores the fantasies, emotions, and memories. See the trailer below.

A Real Knockout

Posted in Culture with tags , , , on March 10, 2013 by substanceandstyledc

His story has been framed by the media for decades. At one time he was one of the most controversial figures in sports and entertainment. April 26 and April 27, Mike Tyson brings his one man autobiographical show Mike Tyson: Undisputed Truth to the Warner Theatre. Directed by Spike Lee the performance is described as a rare, personal look inside the life and mind of one of the most feared men ever to wear the heavyweight crown. From the streets, to the boxing ring, film, television and now the stage, Iron Mike Tyson is finally telling his story in his own words.

Convert

Posted in Culture, Politics with tags , , , on February 4, 2013 by substanceandstyledc

WMT-12010_ConvertHmpg_cs2Modify. Transform. Adopt. Convert. All of them are simple words with often complicated implications. In the play The Convert written by Danai Gurira and directed by Michael John Garcés at Wooly Mammoth Theatre the complications are made clear and real.

Set in 1895 amid the colonial scramble for Southern Africa, the play follows Jekesai, a young girl who escapes village life and a forced marriage arrangement, ultimately discovering Christianity under the guidance of an African teacher. However, as anti-colonial sentiments rise to a boiling point, Jekesai must choose between her new European God and the spirits of her ancestors.

The Convert runs February 13 through March 10. In addition to performances, there is a series of discussions and activities to complement the show.

Dance, dance, dance!

Posted in Culture with tags , , , on January 18, 2013 by substanceandstyledc

EvidenceThis year, February is a month to explore and enjoy dance for arts lovers in the Washington. Friday, February 1 Ron K. Brown brings his Brooklyn-based dance company Evidence back to George Washington University’s Lisner Auditorium for a program that includes On Earth Together, comprised of Stevie Wonder songs. February 5 – February 10, now under the direction of Robert Battle, America’s cultural ambassador to the world, Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater returns to the Kennedy Center for its annual engagement featuring a combination of captivating new work and enduring classics. And not to be missed is the area debut of a new collaboration between choreographer Bill T. Jones and SITI Company’s Anne Bogart. In A Rite, these two artists have deconstructed the original score of Stravinsky’s The Rite of Spring to create a provocative meditation on the power of singular new works of art to alter the way we think.

Our Beloved Justice

Posted in Culture with tags , , , , on January 14, 2013 by substanceandstyledc

Our beloved Supreme Court Justice that represents an American dream come true, the Honorable Sonia Sotomayor will appear in an intimate conversation Friday, January 18 at 7:00pm at George Washington University’s Lisner Auditorium discussing her new book. Sotomayor, the High Court’s first Hispanic member, knew from early on that she wanted to be a lawyer; by age forty, she was a federal district judge. Her memoir, My Beloved World is a story of hard work, vision, and perseverance despite many obstacles. Her rise as a Latina from a Bronx housing project to a spot on the Supreme Court inspires hope in oneself and the Nation. Tickets can be purchased in advance. One book and one ticket: $30; one book and two tickets: $40.

A Beautiful Sound in the Neighborhood

Posted in Culture with tags , , , , , , on January 3, 2013 by substanceandstyledc
Jessye Norman

Jessye Norman

The National Symphony Orchestra (NSO) is making U Street, Howard University, Shaw, and Logan Circle the focus of its free community engagement activities in January 2013. Between January 8 and 14, members of the NSO are breaking into small ensembles to perform chamber music and educational activities as requested by community organizations. The NSO has worked with approximately 20 partners in these communities, and has agreed to fulfill more than 30 activities requested by the neighborhoods. Venues include the Lincoln Theater, Florida Avenue Baptist Church, Howard University’s Cramton Auditorium, Whole Foods and Dahlak Eritrean Restaurant.

The culminating event in the will be a concert by the full NSO at Howard University’s Cramton Auditorium, January 14, at 7 p.m. which will be led by NSO Music Director Christoph Eschenbach and NSO Principal Pops Conductor Steven Reineke. The celebrated soprano Jessye Norman, a graduate of Howard University, will perform, and the program will include the Washington premiere of George Walker’s Sinfonia No. 4, co-commissioned by the NSO. Events are free but some do require registration in advance. View the full schedule here.

Emancipation: 1863 & 1963

Posted in Culture, Politics with tags , , on December 12, 2012 by substanceandstyledc

RRXCF00ZThe year 2013 marks two historic milestones in American history, the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation and the anniversary of the 1963 March on Washington. The National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) and the National Archives are recognizing these events.

Changing America: The Emancipation Proclamation, 1863 and the March on Washington, 1963, opens December 14, 2012 at NMAAHC’s temporary gallery on level two at American History. The exhibition, features historic photographs, paintings, new film footage and objects, that explores the historical context of these two crucial events, their accomplishments and limitations, and their impact on the generations that followed. The exhibit runs through September 2013.

The National Archives will celebrate the 150th Anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation with a free special display of the original document from December 30, 2012 through January 1, 2013. The Emancipation Proclamation is displayed only for a limited time each year because of its fragility, which can be made worse by exposure to light, and the need to preserve it for future generations. Other special programs marking the 150th anniversary will be held throughout the year.

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